Do not put liquid spilled iPhone in Rice!

Liquid spilled iPhone needs a serious attention. A lot of people believe that rice is the remedy for a liquid spilled iPhone. The Myth is: put the water submerged or any liquid spilled iPhone or device in the bag of rice – and… Voila! This is not productive. This is a wrong practice. Rice does not help cure water submerged iPhone. It may only absorb surface water which you could do just by wiping out with any peace of clothes or paper towel. Even wiping water by your bare hand or fingers can be more effective than putting liquid spilled iPhone in a bag of rice. .

Rice can not dry out the liquid residing inside. The only productive job of saving liquid spilled iPhone is by cleaning internal components of the liquid spilled iPhone ASAP. This applies to almost any electronic devices that accidentally comes in contact to any liquid substances. The main causing factor of liquid spill is an instant conduction and the fastest growth of corrosion. Either of these is strong enough to kill a device almost instantly or over time.

What happens to the liquid spilled iPhone?

The first agreement is that the liquid passes inside the device through vents and affects any neighboring components possible. Why? Because water either works as a conductive agent to facilitate in-circuit current to flow randomly over other neighboring components or opposite circuit lines or assists to the aggressive growth of corrosion once in contact. This is not good.

Most of the general cases are reported as instant battery failure, charging port malfunction and display issues if the spill is weak to travel through. Severe cases are reported about damaging the logic board hence permanently turning the device into a useless chunk. You would not like to throw it away neither you would be able to use it as intended.

Why does a liquid spilled iPhone die in a few days even though it just worked fine after spill contact?

In several cases, liquid spilled iPhone seems working just fine even after completely submerged in water.

When the device supposedly sank into the water, the chemical contained in the water and the neatness of the device where on such a blend that water acted as if non-conducting agent and also it quickly bided back. The result – iPhone acted as if it did not get hurt. Not quite true. Virtually, the user didn’t see the emancipating impact inside that was yet to begin in a crawling pace.

Upon such, the assumption is that the spill must have left some traces behind from where the corrosion begins: cleaner water, slower progress; hardware or the water full of heavy minerals or salt or seawater or the device found submerged in toilet, faster progress thus aggressive corrosion.

Once the corrosion or the rust begins to spread between microscopic components and circuits or component soldiered lines, it creates an spark or the circuit current may collide and blast a whole or may cause irrecoverable impairs on a modern chip(s), transistor(s) or capacitor(s). The same device working a few seconds earlier, seems died all of a sudden. It’s not ‘all of a sudden death’ though. It is the result of a progressive spill impact inside the device. It was meant to be so internally. Virtually, the user enjoyed a working device for a while.

Any electrical device that once came in contact of liquid, if not treated or cleaned thoroughly by a professional, its death is very speculative. Cleaning may extend the lifespan of the device.

Summary

Once again ‘Do not put liquid spilled iPhone in Rice!’ Better use a towel, paper towel or any soft peace of cloths to wipe it clean externally and do not turn it on. Rush to the repair shop or service store for a neat cleaning service.

By |2017-06-07T16:35:45-04:00June 12th, 2015|

About the Author:

Purushotam Pokharel, the owner of APPLE REPAIR CLUB, is a passionate and Linux professional. He is active in public awareness concerning computing technology, threats, complex OS issues and flaws that may sometimes turmoil our everyday lives. He is active in solving WordPress backend issues and offers Managed WordPress support 24/7/365 for those who lack 'how to'. Approach him at NailWP for support. He researches Mac issues and publishes at MacIssue.